Author Archives: anomalogue

What is religion?

What is religion? My definition is very broad: Religion is the concious effort to situate ourselves within a reality that involves but infinitely exceeds us conceptually, practically and morally.

Posted in Ethics, Judaism, Metaphysics, Philosophy | Leave a comment

Mikvah

Today is my mikvah. Sometime around 10:45-11:15am EST other Jews will know me as a fellow Jew. I cannot explain why this matters so much to me, but it does. And I understand why many people cannot understand how much this matters … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, Judaism | Leave a comment

Rosenzweig and the philosopher-hybrid

I get the same feeling reading Rosenzweig as I do reading Levinas: I begin to feel a little like a paraphrasing popularizer, or vulgarizer. In a little over a day from now I hope I’ll just feel like a fellow … Continue reading

Posted in Judaism, Philosophy | Leave a comment

Church name

I’m going to see if I can talk one of my Catholic friends into starting a church and naming it “Our Lady of Perpetual Shock”.

Posted in Philosophy | Leave a comment

Turtles

This I know: We can only love where dread can and might irrupt. This I hope: Where dread irrupts, we can love. * Beyond my everything-sized soul there is a braided ring of dread, love and nothingness, Beyond that ring, perhaps there … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Leave a comment

Hiddennesses

A solved problem. A defined problem believed to have a solution. A defined problem whose solution may be impossible. A defined problem believed to have no possible solution. An undefined but acknowledged felt difficulty believed to contain a definable problem. … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, Philosophy | Leave a comment

V’ahavta

Some entities cannot be comprehended, only known-toward. This is a kind of knowing, but it only appears such if we allow knowing to be more than the conceptual grasping of objective comprehension. This doesn’t mean that objective comprehension is a … Continue reading

Posted in Judaism | Leave a comment